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Canberra, Australia’s first pill testing clinic: 40% of samples contained no cocaine

Australia’s first drug testing clinic makes an extraordinary discovery about the country’s cocaine supply – and users who paid big bucks are NOT happy

  • Australia’s first pill-testing clinic finds 40% of samples contained no cocaine
  • The six-month pilot opened in Canberra at the end of July and will run until January
  • The program allows people to go and test drugs and pills for free

Australia’s first fixed pill and drug testing clinic found that 40% of cocaine samples tested did not actually contain cocaine.

The six-month pilot program which began in late July at the City of Canberra Community Health Center allows users to test their recreational narcotics for free in a bid to reduce the risk of overdose.

But many addicts, who pay some of the highest prices for cocaine in the world, left the government-run testing lab disappointed.

Australia’s first fixed pill and drug testing clinic found 40% of cocaine samples tested did not actually contain cocaine

The six-month pilot program which began in late July at the City of Canberra Community Health Center (pictured) allows users to test their recreational narcotics for free in a bid to reduce the risk of overdose

The six-month pilot program which began in late July at the City of Canberra Community Health Center (pictured) allows users to test their recreational narcotics for free in a bid to reduce the risk of overdose

Since its launch, the CanTEST health and medication verification service has reviewed 58 samples, and 18 people have discarded their medications once the results are known.

According The Guardianthe researchers found that all of the cocaine tested had purity levels below 27%, with 40% of the samples registering no cocaine results.

The price of the dangerous drug has soared 50% in Australia since the start of the Covid pandemic, reaching a price of over $450 a gram in some places.

A recent report by the New South Wales Crime Commission found the cost of importing the drug has soared to a staggering wholesale price of $200,000 a kilo, with ongoing global supply chain issues hampering operations international drug smuggling markets and drive up the cost.

A group of people seen dancing inside a nightclub

A group of people seen dancing inside a nightclub

Australia and New Zealand have long been seen as a fertile market for cocaine profits, with residents willing to pay more exuberant prices than anywhere on the planet.

This incentivizes organized crime groups such as outlaw motorcycle gangs and drug syndicates from Asia and the Middle East to cut cocaine with other substances to maximize profits.

These groups used to pay around $125,000 per kilo before the Covid pandemic in 2019, which translates to around $300 per gram on the street.

In places like Europe and the United States, a kilo, mostly produced in South American countries like Colombia and Peru, fetches only around $20,000 to $30,000.

“The increase in value is primarily attributed to supply and demand issues, as organized crime groups have struggled to export banned drugs from the sources,” the report said.

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